Extractions

Sometimes, even with the most diligent oral health regime an issue can arise that results in the loss of a tooth. For a wide variety of reasons, be it an accident or trauma, severe decay, advanced periodontal disease or a poorly positioned tooth, tooth extraction is an extremely common occurrence. Rest assured that our Grande Prairie-based team at Higson Dental Group are here to help you through the procedure with the best possible result.

It’s important to know that even the removal of one tooth can lead to bigger problems in your mouth such as your impairing your ability to chew, shifting your teeth and issues with your jaw joint. We will make sure to address all possible complications and choose the best restoration option for you.

The Extraction Process

When it’s time for your tooth extraction, we will make you feel as comfortable as possible. First, we use a local anesthetic to numb your tooth, jawbone and surrounding gums.

Once you are ready, much like pulling a tooth when you were younger, we will begin rocking your tooth back and forth to loosen it from its socket for easier removal. You will feel pressure but no pain because the freezing will have numbed the nerves. This is generally a quick and straightforward procedure. However, if you experience any pain during the extraction, let us know right away so we can address the issue.

Sectioning a Tooth

In some cases a tooth may not want to go! If it is too firmly anchored in the jaw, or the root is curved, your dentist may have to section the tooth, meaning we cut the tooth into segments and remove it in sections.

This is a very common procedure. Again, the areas surrounding your compromised tooth will be numb and you will not feel any pain during the extraction.

Tooth Extraction Homecare

Once the tooth is pulled, we’ll have you bite on a gauze pad for 20 to 30 minutes to form a blood clot in the socket and stop the bleeding. If your wound continues to bleed or ooze, replace the gauze and bite firmly for another 30 minutes. You may need to repeat this process until the bleeding completely subsides.

It’s important to make sure the blood clot remains undisturbed so healing can begin. We recommend against any oral activity that could aggravate the wound. Refrain from heavy rinsing, sucking on straws, smoking, drinking alcohol or brushing next to the extraction site for 24 hours. Any of these things could disturb the wound, resume the bleeding or cause an infection. We may also recommend limiting vigorous exercise for the first 24 hours as it can increase blood pressure and cause more bleeding at the wound site.

It is normal to feel some pain and swelling after a tooth extraction. Using mild pain medication and icing the extraction site with an ice pack will help keep discomfort to a minimum. Symptoms usually subside after 48 hours.

If we have prescribed antibiotics, take them to their full duration until they are all gone to ensure all infection is gone, even if you are feeling fine. Drink plenty of clear fluid and nutritious soft food on the day of the extraction. After the procedure, try to eat on the opposite side of the extraction site for 24 hours, or until it has healed.

You’ll be able to resume your daily brushing and flossing regime 24 hours after the extraction. Be mindful of your dental work, but regular dental care will speed healing and help keep your mouth fresh and clean. In no time you will feel like yourself and be back to normal activity.

If any symptoms continue such as bleeding, pain or swelling for two to three days after treatment, or if you have a reaction to the medication, please call our office immediately.

Contact